Understanding Your IRS Notice or Letter

Understanding Your IRS Notice or Letter

Your notice or letter will explain the reason for the contact and give you instructions on how to handle the issue.

If you agree with the information, there is no need to contact us.

Enter your notice or letter number above to get more information on IRS notices and letters, along with answers to many notice-related questions. If your notice or letter doesn’t return a result using the Notices & Letters Search on this page, contact us at the toll-free number 800-829-1040.

The IRS sends notices and letters for the following reasons:

Each notice or letter contains a lot of valuable information, so it’s very important that you read it carefully. If we changed your tax return, compare the information we provided in the notice or letter with the information in your original return. 

If your notice or letter requires a response by a specific date, there are two main reasons you’ll want to comply:

Pay as much as you can, even if you can’t pay the full amount you owe. You can pay online or apply for an Online Payment Agreement or Offer in Compromise. Visit our payments page for more information.

It’s important to keep a copy of all notices or letters with your tax records. You may need these documents at a later date.

We provide our contact phone number on the top right-hand corner of the notice or letter. Typically, you only need to contact us if you don’t agree with the information, if we requested additional information, or if you have a balance due. You can also write to us at the address in the notice or letter. If you write, allow at least 30 days for our response.

You can find the notice (CP) or letter (LTR) number on either the top or the bottom right-hand corner of your correspondence.

Please visit our Report Phishing page if you receive a notice or letter that looks suspicious and was designed to appear as though it came from the IRS. You can also call 800-829-1040. We never ask taxpayers for personal information via e-mail or social media.

Research & References of Understanding Your IRS Notice or Letter|A&C Accounting And Tax Services
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