WebMD: Seasonal Allergy Symptoms Nationwide

WebMD: Seasonal Allergy Symptoms Nationwide

WebMD: Seasonal Allergy Symptoms Nationwide

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There isn’t enough data for your area to show seasonal allergy symptom activity. Prevent allergy symptoms by lowering your pollen exposure.

Seasonal allergy symptoms in your area appear mild. Enjoy the outdoors, and keep an eye on the daily pollen count.

Seasonal allergy symptoms in your area appear mild to moderate. Keep an eye on the daily pollen count, and consider ways to lower your exposure to pollen.

Seasonal allergy symptoms in your area appear moderate. Close the windows, and protect yourself from pollen.

Seasonal allergy symptoms in your area appear moderate to severe. Take steps to keep pollen outside and off your body!

Seasonal allergy symptoms in your area appear severe. Stay indoors during peak pollen counts, or delay outdoor activities and take your allergy medication with you.

The WebMD symptom map is powered by MapBox.com, and your use is governed by their privacy policy.

Reviewed by
Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH on January 26, 2016

Sources: Sources

WebMD Symptom Checker

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information: Sources

The information in the WebMD Symptom map reflects the self-reported information of WebMD users nationwide reporting certain symptoms within the Symptom Checker. This tool does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice or delay seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. For more information, please read additional information.

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WebMD: Seasonal Allergy Symptoms Nationwide

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Top Items for Your Allergy Relief Kit

Top Items for Your Allergy Relief Kit

When allergies leave you red-eyed and itchy, eyedrops can help. They ease inflammation so your eyes don’t itch, tear up, or swell. Use antihistamine drops with ketotifen in them before you go outside to prevent symptoms. Try artificial tears to flush out allergens. Or look into over-the-counter decongestant eyedrops to help curb the redness. Ask your doctor what you need.

If stuffiness and congestion are your biggest problems, you may need decongestants. They help shrink your nasal tissues, which swell during an allergic reaction. You can get them over the counter as pills. Some are mixed with an antihistamine. If you have a health problem like high blood pressure, glaucoma, or thyroid disease, talk to your doctor before you take them.

Steroid versions are often the first choice to treat an allergy. If your nose feels dry inside, try a nasal saline spray to moisten it. Decongestants also come as sprays. Don’t use them for more than 3 days in a row. After that, they’ll make your symptoms worse. 

You need them to ease allergy symptoms such as a runny nose, sneezing, and itchy, watery eyes. They block a substance called histamine, which your immune system makes when you come across an allergen. You can get them over the counter and by prescription. Newer ones like cetirizine, desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, and loratadine are less likely to make you sleepy. Check with your doctor or pharmacist. 

Allergies often affect asthma. If you get asthma attacks or bronchospasms, your doctor will prescribe an inhaler. This device delivers doses of a short-acting medication called a bronchodilator. If you have a mild attack, a couple of puffs will quickly relax the muscles around your airways. Inhaled steroids, another common treatment, won’t ease symptoms right away. Instead, you take them for long-term control of lung inflammation.

If you’re at risk for a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction (your doctor will call it anaphylaxis), you’ll need an epinephrine auto-injector in your kit. Using it can stop or curb a dangerous reaction to foods, medications, or insect stings that causes your airways to swell, makes it hard for you to breathe, and lowers your blood pressure. This type of reaction can be life-threatening if you don’t treat it right away.

Keep small tubes of moisturizer and hydrocortisone cream in your allergy kit. Use them to treat allergic reactions that show up on your skin. Moisturizers can soothe the dry, itchy feeling, and hydrocortisone cream eases inflammation. Your doctor may suggest or prescribe other medications for more serious reactions or eczema.

If you have a life-threatening allergy, you should wear a medical alert bracelet. If your allergies are mild, you can store medical information on a laminated card in your allergy kit. Include your type of allergy, your doctor’s name and phone number, emergency contact information, and health insurance information.

If you travel a lot and you have dust mite allergies, pack a dust mite-proof, zippered pillow cover. You might even think about a mattress cover to boot. It’s a bit more to pack, but you’ll be able to fend off this allergy and asthma trigger wherever you spend the night.

Once your allergy kit is complete, go over it with your doctor. Then carry your kit with you at all times in a purse or briefcase. You could also make multiple kits — one for home, one for travel, and one for work. Check it often for items that are expired or need to be replaced. Store one in your carry-on bag when you travel. 

Sources
|

Medically Reviewed on 06/17/2017

Reviewed by Melinda

Ratini, DO, MS on June 17, 2017

 

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology.
American Academy of Family Physicians.
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.
Sanford Health.

Reviewed by Melinda

Ratini, DO, MS on June 17, 2017

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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How to Conquer Your Allergies

How to Conquer Your Allergies

Allergies can really get to you. But you don’t have to suffer. Take these steps to control the things that trigger your reactions.

Pollen, mold, dust mites, and animal dander are some of the usual things that cause itchy eyes and congestion. To get rid of them, you can make changes in your home and your daily habits, as well as taking your medicine.

Keep windows closed and use air conditioning.

Clean air filters frequently and air ducts at least once a year.

Keep humidity in your house at 50% or below to prevent mold growth.

Install dehumidifiers in basements and other damp areas. Avoid moldy areas: basements, garages, crawl spaces, barns, and compost heaps.

Keep pets outside. If you must keep pets indoors, don’t allow them in bedrooms. And bathe them often.

Use special covers for pillows, mattresses, and box springs. You might want to get rid of overstuffed furniture or down-filled bedding/pillows, too.

Wash bedding in hot water every week to kill dust mites. Dry laundry in a dryer, not outside on a clothesline.

Wear a mask and gloves when you clean, so you limit your exposure to irritating chemicals.

Rethink your floors. If possible, hard surfaces are better than carpeting. Cut down on throw rugs, too.

Avoid dust-collecting window blinds and long drapes. Use window shades instead.

Vacuum with a double-layered microfilter bag or a HEPA filter. Wear a mask while you vacuum, and avoid the room for about 20 minutes to let the air settle back down.

Don’t smoke, and avoid secondhand smoke. It may aggravate your allergies.

Check the forecast. Stay indoors on hot, dry, windy days when the pollen count is high. If mold is a problem, stay inside during rainy or windy days.

Time things right. Between 5 and 10 a.m., pollen counts are highest.

Rethink your yard work. Avoid being around freshly cut grass whenever possible. Mowing stirs up grass pollen. Flowers are loaded with pollen; so are many trees. Raking leaves stirs up mold spores. You’ll need to take your meds and limit your time, or ask someone to help you.

Wear a mask. If you must work in the yard, an inexpensive painter’s mask will filter out some of the pollen as well as mold.

Take a shower. After being outdoors, get rid of allergens that may have collected in your clothes and hair. Take a shower, wash your hair, and change clothes.

Keep car windows closed, and close vents. Use air conditioning.

You’re allergic but want to keep your pet. Since there’s no completely “hypoallergenic” dog or cat, these strategies may help:

Make your bedroom off-limits. You spend a lot of time there, so if you keep your pet out of that room, that will help.

Dust with a damp cloth often. You might want to wear a mask when you do that.

Clean up after playtime. Wash your hands and change your clothes after you play with your pet.

SOURCES:

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Pollen Allergy,” “Pet Allergy: Are You Allergic to Dogs or Cats?”

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: “Pollen,” “Dust Mites,” “Pets,” “Cigarette Smoke.

Pagination

Make these tweaks to your diet, home, and lifestyle.

Breathe easier with these products.

Live in harmony with your cat or dog.

Which ones affect you?

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An Education on Allergies

An Education on Allergies

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Allergic Asthma Triggers to Watch For

Allergic Asthma Triggers to Watch For

If your child has allergic asthma and inhales one of his triggers, that can launch an attack, making him cough, wheeze, and have trouble breathing. It’s best to know what your child’s triggers are so you can help him avoid them altogether or at least keep them far, far away.

Each person has their own set of asthma triggers, but there are some common ones you can watch for.

These tiny critters are one of the most common triggers of allergic asthma. They survive on the dead skin flakes that all humans shed naturally. They hide in sheets, mattresses, pillows, blankets, stuffed toys, carpets, curtains, and upholstered furniture. There’s not much you can do about shedding dead skin, but you can work to keep dust mites from bothering your family. Wash any bed linens that you can at least once a week in hot water, then put them in a hot dryer. Wash stuffed toys the same way. There are also special covers for mattresses and pillows. If you can, trade in carpets, rugs, and fabric furniture for wood, vinyl, and other smooth surfaces.

These pests are everywhere but are most common in cities and in southern U.S. states. They eat and drink the same things you do: water and leftovers. But they (and their droppings) can trigger asthma flares. To prevent them, keep food stored in the fridge or in an airtight container, wash dishes right after you use them, sweep up any crumbs, and plug any holes or cracks that let cockroaches get inside. You can also set out traps. If you see any roach droppings, sweep them up right away and put them in the trash. And keep a lid on your trash can inside and take it out often.

It’s both an indoor and outdoor trigger for allergic asthma. Outside, it thrives in soil and plant debris, which doesn’t really pose a health problem. Inside, mold is a hazard, lurking in damp places like basements, the kitchen sink, and anywhere you have leaks or standing water. Your best defense is to get rid of as much moisture as possible from your home. Clean up any mold you can see, use exhaust fans when you’re in the shower, and run a dehumidifier or air conditioner. A drier house will also cut down on roaches and mites.

Cats, dogs, hamsters, birds, and other furry and feathered friends can also be asthma triggers. But the fur and feathers aren’t the problem. It’s the animals’ dander, urine, and saliva. If you don’t have a pet, it’s best not to get one. If you do, try to keep her outdoors, or at least out of your child’s bedroom and off of upholstered furniture and carpets. It’s also a good idea to bathe the pet at least once a week and vacuum or sweep regularly.

Pollen allergies depend on where you live and the time of the year. For instance, pollen from trees tends to be a problem in the spring, while grass is a problem in the summer, and fall means weeds. (Climate change also means that pollen seasons can last longer than they used to.) Thunderstorms can also cause plants to release their pollen. Keep an eye on local weather forecasts and pollen counts, and have your child stay indoors on days when the counts are high.

There are a million good reasons to keep yourself and your child away from tobacco smoke, and allergic asthma is one of them. Secondhand smoke is extra toxic to young children because their lungs aren’t mature yet. Make sure no one smokes in your home or your car. Other types of smoke, such as from wood-burning stoves, can also make asthma worse. If you can, avoid wood fires, inside and outside.

Many household products give off scents that can trigger an asthma attack. This includes cleaning agents with chlorine, scented candles, incense, hairspray, air fresheners, deodorants and perfumes, paint, and pesticides. Look for fragrance-free personal care products. If you need to use paint or pesticides, make sure your child is not nearby.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on January 04, 2018

Sources

SOURCES:

UptoDate: “Trigger control to enhance asthma management,” “Patient education: Trigger avoidance in asthma (Beyond the Basics).”

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Allergens and Allergic Asthma.”

Environmental Protection Agency: “Asthma Triggers: Gain Control.”

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Indoor Allergens,” “Spring Allergies.”

CDC: “Common Asthma Triggers.”

Environmental Health Watch: “Controlling Asthma Triggers in the Home.”

American Lung Association: “Reduce Asthma Triggers.”

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