Fast Five Quiz: Back and Neck Pain

Fast Five Quiz: Back and Neck Pain

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Stephen Kishner, MD, MHA

June 11, 2020

Back pain, especially lower back pain, is one of the top causes of disability-adjusted life-years worldwide. Likewise, neck pain is a pervasive issue. Among adults, 60%-80% experience back pain that interferes with daily activities during their lifetime, while 20%-70% will experience neck pain. From poor posture to significant underlying conditions, the treatment of back and neck pain depends on the cause.

Are you familiar with various causes of back and neck pain, as well as key aspects of presentation and best practices for diagnosis and treatment? Refresh and test your knowledge of these common conditions with this quick quiz.

Medscape © 2020 WebMD, LLC

Any views expressed above are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of WebMD or Medscape.

Cite this: Stephen Kishner. Fast Five Quiz: Back and Neck Pain – Medscape – Jun 11, 2020.

Professor of Clinical Medicine; Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program Director, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana

Disclosure: Stephen Kishner, MD, MHA, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

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Fast Five Quiz: Back and Neck Pain

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A 26-Year-Old Woman Who Uses a Walking Cane Because of Pain

A 26-Year-Old Woman Who Uses a Walking Cane Because of Pain

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Ricardo Correa, MD; Gauri Behari, MD

September 13, 2019

Editor’s Note:
The Case Challenge series includes difficult-to-diagnose conditions, some of which are not frequently encountered by most clinicians but are nonetheless important to accurately recognize. Test your diagnostic and treatment skills using the following patient scenario and corresponding questions. If you have a case that you would like to suggest for a future Case Challenge, please contact us.

A 26-year-old woman with a medical history of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease presents with severe knee pain. She now requires a cane for walking, owing to hip and knee pain. She also has abnormal dentition with tooth loss that required dental implants a few years ago. For 2 years, she has had a nonhealing small avulsion fracture in her right first metatarsal, which is confirmed by radiography.

Upon physical examination, the patient is alert, awake, and oriented. Dental implants in the frontal area are noted. Cardiopulmonary examination reveals regular rate and rhythm, with no murmurs. Her lungs are clear to auscultation. Her abdomen is soft, nondistended, and nontender, with normal bowel sounds.

She has no joint swelling but has decreased range of motion of her shoulders, hip, and bilateral knees owing to pain. Her left tibia is tender to palpation.

Laboratory findings reveal the following:

Calcium level: 9.2 mg/dL

Phosphorus level: 3.7 mg/dL

Albumin level: 4 g/dL

Vitamin D level: 52 ng/mL

Vitamin B6 level: 175 ng/mL

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level: 12 U/L

The remainder of her laboratory findings, including complete blood cell count, renal function, and liver function test results, are normal.

Imaging studies include the following:

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Medscape © 2019 WebMD, LLC

Any views expressed above are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of WebMD or Medscape.

Cite this: Ricardo Correa, Gauri Behari. A 26-Year-Old Woman Who Uses a Walking Cane Because of Pain – Medscape – Sep 13, 2019.

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona

Disclosure: Ricardo Correa, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Fellow, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona

Disclosure: Gauri Behari, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

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Fast Five Quiz: Treatment of Hereditary (Familial) Transthyretin-Related Amyloidosis (hATTR)

Fast Five Quiz: Treatment of Hereditary (Familial) Transthyretin-Related Amyloidosis (hATTR)

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Jefferson R. Roberts, MD

July 11, 2019

Hereditary (familial) transthyretin-related amyloidosis (hATTR) is a rare, severely debilitating, and often fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR). It results in abnormal amyloid protein buildup in multiple organ systems, leading to progressive peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. Due to the multiorgan system involvement of the disease, an interdisciplinary approach to treatment is crucial to manage all comorbidities. Available treatment modalities include surgical and pharmacotherapeutic options.

How much do you know about the treatment of hATTR? Test your knowledge with this short quiz.

Medscape © 2019 WebMD, LLC

Any views expressed above are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of WebMD or Medscape.

Cite this: Jefferson R. Roberts. Fast Five Quiz: Treatment of Hereditary (Familial) Transthyretin-Related Amyloidosis (hATTR) – Medscape – Jul 11, 2019.

Chief of Rheumatology Service, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland

Disclosure: Jefferson R. Roberts, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

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