Nevus Sebaceus

Nevus Sebaceus

No Results

No Results

processing….

In 1895, Jadassohn first described nevus sebaceous (see the image below), a circumscribed hamartomatous lesion predominantly composed of sebaceous glands. Sebaceous nevi and verrucous epidermal nevi are closely related, and many authors regard them as variants.

See 13 Common-to-Rare Infant Skin Conditions, a Critical Images slideshow, to help identify rashes, birthmarks, and other skin conditions encountered in infants.

In nevus sebaceus, postzygotic somatic mutations may result in various clinical expressions of mosaicism. Mutations in pluripotential cells may give rise to hamartomas with multiple cell lines.

Familial cases have been reported. [1, 2, 3] Mutations in pluripotential cells during embryogenesis may generate varying lines of differentiation included in organoid nevi. Nevus sebaceus appears to respond to hormonal influences, as the lesion can be raised at birth, become flattened in childhood, and become raised again during puberty.

Deletions of the patched gene have been identified in nevus sebaceus and may be responsible for the predisposition to the development of basal cell carcinoma and other tumors in this lesion.

United States

Nevus sebaceus occurs with equal frequency in males and females of all races. Of newborns, 0.3% are affected by nevus sebaceus.

International

Sebaceous nevi are sporadic and occur with equal frequency in males and females of all races.

Nevus sebaceus occurs with equal frequency in males and females of all races.

Males and females are equally affected by nevus sebaceus.

Nevus sebaceus is usually noted as a solitary lesion at birth or in early childhood, whereas the characteristic features may not develop until puberty.

The medical importance of a solitary nevus sebaceus relates to the description of both benign change and, in some cases, malignant neoplastic change. While malignant transformation was reported in older series to occur in 10-15% of lesions, newer studies show this occurrence is certainly less than 1% and nearly always occurs after puberty. The most common malignant neoplasm arising in this disorder is basal cell carcinoma. Studies indicate that the development of basal cell carcinoma or any other malignant neoplasm is uncommon. The most frequent benign tumors are trichoblastomas and syringocystadenoma papilliferum, occurring in less than 5% of nevus sebaceus. [4]

Other benign and malignant tumors include apocrine cystadenoma, leiomyoma and sebaceous cell carcinoma. Rarely, malignant eccrine poromas, sebaceous carcinomas, and apocrine carcinomas have been reported to result in widespread metastases and death.

Nevus sebaceous is a rare benign tumor in children that usually presents with warty patches of hair loss on the scalp.

The development of secondary malignant neoplasms within the nevus sebaceus is rare and occurs almost exclusively in adults.

Old reports overestimate the frequency of malignant tumors. This was due to misdiagnosis of basal cell carcinomas that were in fact trichoblastomas (benign form of neoplasm that look like basal cell carcinoma histologically).

Possible signs of malignancy include ulceration or a new “bump” on the area; thus if any change is seen within the nevus sebaceous, the patients should seek medical advice.

Given the low risk of malignant transformation in children, clinical follow-up is considered to be a safe alternative to prophylactic surgical excision.

If treatment is chosen, surgical excision would be the treatment of choice; however, the timing of the surgery is controversial.

Factors to be considered include the size and location of the nevus, its cosmetic significance, and the risks and benefits of early excision (which usually requires general anesthesia) versus delayed excision (which is usually with local anesthesia).

Fearfield LA, Bunker CB. Familial naevus sebaceous of Jadassohn. Br J Dermatol. 1998 Dec. 139(6):1119-20. [Medline].

Happle R, Konig A. Familial naevus sebaceus may be explained by paradominant transmission. Br J Dermatol. 1999 Aug. 141(2):377. [Medline].

Sahl WJ Jr. Familial nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: occurrence in three generations. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1990 May. 22(5 Pt 1):853-4. [Medline].

Jaqueti G, Requena L, Sanchez Yus E. Trichoblastoma is the most common neoplasm developed in nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: a clinicopathologic study of a series of 155 cases. Am J Dermatopathol. 2000 Apr. 22(2):108-18. [Medline].

Warnke PH, Russo PA, Schimmelpenning GW, et al. Linear intraoral lesions in the sebaceous nevus syndrome. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Feb. 52(2 Suppl 1):62-4. [Medline].

Kavak A, Ozcelik D, Belenli O, Buyukbabani N, Saglam I, Lazova R. A unique location of naevus sebaceus: labia minora. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008 Sep. 22(9):1136-8. [Medline].

Baykal C, Buyukbabani N, Yazganoglu KD, Saglik E. [Tumors associated with nevus sebaceous]. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2006 Jan. 4(1):28-31. [Medline].

Cribier B, Scrivener Y, Grosshans E. Tumors arising in nevus sebaceus: A study of 596 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Feb. 42(2 Pt 1):263-8. [Medline].

Correale D, Ringpfeil F, Rogers M. Large, papillomatous, pedunculated nevus sebaceus: a new phenotype. Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 May-Jun. 25(3):355-8. [Medline].

Rodins K, Baillie L. Hybrid follicular cyst (pilomatrical and infundibular) arising within a sebaceous nevus. Pediatr Dermatol. 2012 Mar-Apr. 29(2):213-6. [Medline].

Ivker R, Resnick SD, Skidmore RA. Hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets, precocious puberty, and the epidermal nevus syndrome. Arch Dermatol. 1997 Dec. 133(12):1557-61. [Medline].

James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM, Neuhaus IM. Sebaceus nevi. Andrews’ Diseases of the Skin. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2016. 655-6.

Barkham MC, White N, Brundler MA, Richard B, Moss C. Should naevus sebaceus be excised prophylactically? A clinical audit. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2007. 60(11):1269-70. [Medline].

Idriss MH, Elston DM. Secondary neoplasms associated with nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: a study of 707 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. Feb2014. 70(2):332-7. [Medline].

Anwar Al Hammadi, MD, FRCPC Consultant and Head of Dermatology, Rashid Hospital, Dubai Health Authority; Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology, Dubai Medical College; Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology, University of Sharjah, UAE

Anwar Al Hammadi, MD, FRCPC is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Canadian Dermatology Association, Skin Cancer Foundation

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Mark G Lebwohl, MD Chairman, Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Mark G Lebwohl, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Received none from Amgen for consultant & investigator; Received none from Novartis for consultant & investigator; Received none from Pfizer for consultant & investigator; Received none from Celgene Corporation for consultant & investigator; Received none from Clinuvel for consultant & investigator; Received none from Eli Lilly & Co. for consultant & investigator; Received none from Janssen Ortho Biotech for consultant & investigator; Received none from LEO Pharmaceuticals for consultant & inves.

David F Butler, MD Former Section Chief of Dermatology, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System; Professor of Dermatology, Texas A&M University College of Medicine; Founding Chair, Department of Dermatology, Scott and White Clinic

David F Butler, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for MOHS Surgery, Association of Military Dermatologists, Phi Beta Kappa

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Van Perry, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio

Van Perry, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

William D James, MD Paul R Gross Professor of Dermatology, Vice-Chairman, Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

William D James, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Received income in an amount equal to or greater than $250 from: Elsevier; WebMD.

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Association for Physician Leadership, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, International Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Nevus Sebaceus

Research & References of Nevus Sebaceus|A&C Accounting And Tax Services
Source