Trending Clinical Topic: Dementia

Trending Clinical Topic: Dementia

Trending Clinical Topic: Dementia

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Ryan Syrek

August 02, 2019

Each week, we identify one top search term, speculate as to what caused its popularity, and provide an infographic on a related condition. If you have thoughts about what’s trending and why, feel free to share them with us on Twitter or Facebook!

From surprising data to emerging treatment options, a wealth of new studies and news items related to virtually all aspects of dementia made that condition this week’s top trending clinical topic. Here’s a rundown of the major recent findings that garnered attention:

A Danish registry study of almost 33,000 patients with dementia found an increased risk for mortality among those who received an antipsychotic drug.

New research suggests that adhering to a healthy lifestyle may reduce the risk for dementia. Investigators found that fewer individuals at high genetic risk who followed a healthy lifestyle developed dementia than those at a high risk who followed an unhealthy lifestyle.

Heavy alcohol use was found to possibly triple the risk for dementia in certain individuals, according to new research.

Although the exact relationship is unclear, a new study found that the frequent use of sleep medications may increase the risk for future cognitive impairment.

A phase 2/3 trial involving the use of an investigational agent that targets gum disease bacteria associated with the development of Alzheimer disease is now under way. This ties into a larger movement to “look beyond amyloid” when investigating Alzheimer disease.

The use of comprehensive remote care via telemedicine to older adults with dementia was found to significantly reduce emergency department visits (24% over a 3-year period).

A global group of neurology experts intent on reducing dementia incidence has called for an increased emphasis on stroke prevention.

New research revealed that sexual or gender minorities (SGM) are almost 30% more likely to report subjective cognitive decline compared with the non-SGM population. These results emphasize the need to educate healthcare professionals about the importance of screening the SGM community for memory problems.

The nearly overwhelming amount of news and research related to dementia contributed to a dramatic increase in searches, pushing the topic to the top of this week’s trending list.



Read more clinical information about dementia.

Medscape © 2019 WebMD, LLC

Any views expressed above are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of WebMD or Medscape.

Cite this: Ryan Syrek. Trending Clinical Topic: Dementia – Medscape – Aug 02, 2019.

Senior Editor, Medical Students, Medscape Drugs & Diseases

Disclosure: Ryan Syrek has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

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A 65-Year-Old Man Brought to the ED by Military Police

A 65-Year-Old Man Brought to the ED by Military Police

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Jeffrey S. Forrest, MD; Alexander B. Shortridge

August 06, 2019

Editor’s Note:
The Case Challenge series includes difficult-to-diagnose conditions, some of which are not frequently encountered by most clinicians but are nonetheless important to accurately recognize. Test your diagnostic and treatment skills using the following patient scenario and corresponding questions. If you have a case that you would like to suggest for a future Case Challenge, please contact us.

A 65-year-old man is brought to the emergency department by military police. The patient, who had been armed with a shotgun, refused to allow his spouse to leave their domicile. During the event, the patient’s relatives contacted the authorities. The patient insisted to his relatives that cell phone towers were beaming in rays that were worsening his wife’s dementia and rheumatoid arthritis. To counter this, the patient placed tin foil on the walls of his house. The patient would not let his spouse leave because he was concerned that government agents were attempting to attack her. The patient stated that he had been “reactivated” to his military duties. After a brief standoff with local police, the patient agreed to cooperate if the military police were contacted. Once the military police arrived, they were able to convince the patient to come out of his home unarmed and brought him to the hospital for treatment.

Upon his initial presentation, the patient refused to answer questions. He only provided his name, his military serial number, and his rank. He responded exclusively with this information to all questions posed to him.

During a follow-up interview the next day, the patient again reported that he had been “reactivated” and had “found some classified files.” The patient stated that he had to report this information and had called the commanding general of the US Army. He stated that his orders were to stay in place and secure the area. He acknowledged having a 16-gauge shotgun during the prior day’s events.

Information was then obtained by telephone from the patient’s son. The son reported that, several years prior, his father had taken his mother to a nearby city for safety because he thought “drones were flying above him” and that he and his wife were not safe. The patient had rented an apartment and placed his spouse inside a closet for safety. The son reported that the patient had been completely irrational at the time. When the son attempted to speak to his father, his father felt that the conversation was being tracked by phone and ended the call. After that incident, the patient’s wife and son came up with a “code word” that she could use on the phone with her son should the patient become irrational again. On the day of the patient’s admission, the patient’s spouse called her son and used that code word.

Medscape © 2019 WebMD, LLC

Any views expressed above are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of WebMD or Medscape.

Cite this: Jeffrey S. Forrest, Alexander B. Shortridge. A 65-Year-Old Man Brought to the ED by Military Police – Medscape – Aug 06, 2019.

Staff Psychiatrist, Orange County Health Care Agency, Santa Ana, California

Disclosure: Jeffrey S. Forrest, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Disclosure: Alexander B. Shortridge has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

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