Drugs & Medications A-Z

Drugs & Medications A-Z

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use.

Considering taking medication to treat diabetes mellitus? Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of diabetes mellitus. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below.

147 medications found for diabetes mellitus

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Common culprits and what you can do.

Things to remember when you fill your prescription.

Tips for dealing with them.

How to make sense of them.

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Do I Need to Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Do I Need to Change My Type 2 Diabetes Medication?

Type 2 diabetes medications offer many options to manage your blood sugar (also known as blood glucose). But if your current treatment isn’t getting the job done or doesn’t feel right for you, talk to your doctor. She may tell you it’s time to change your treatment plan.

It’s important to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. This lowers your chances of diabetes complications. If your readings are too high on your current medication, your doctor might want to change the dose or try another.

This can happen even if your medication worked very well at first. Sometimes it just doesn’t do the trick by itself anymore.

If one drug doesn’t manage your blood sugar well enough, your doctor might add a second. If two don’t work, she could add a third.

Some diabetes medications can make your blood glucose go too low. Your doctor will call this hypoglycemia. It can be dangerous. You might see it with:

Your blood sugar might also go too low if you take combination treatments that have these drugs in them:

Talk to your doctor if you have low readings. You might need a lower dose or different medication.

Some are temporary and should go away within a few weeks after you start the drug. Upset stomach, gas, or diarrhea can happen with:

You might have the same problem with treatments that combine these drugs. Talk to your doctor if your side effects are severe or don’t go away in a few weeks.

Drugs called SGLT2-inhibitors — canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) — have a different set of side effects:

Some side effects are more serious. If you take pioglitazone (Actos) or a combination drug with pioglitazone in it (Actoplus Met, Duetact), call your doctor if you have:

It’s rare, but metformin can cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. It can come on suddenly. Get medical help right away if you are on the drug or a combination that contains it, and if you have any of the following symptoms:

If you’ve made lifestyle changes like weight loss and regular exercise, you might need a lower dose. Your doctor will review your treatment plan and make any needed changes.

Talk to your doctor before you change or stop any medication. Do not quit taking any mediation without her OK.

If you need to start treatment for something besides diabetes, your doctor might want you to change your medications. Things that can affect your diabetes treatment plan include:

Diabetes medications can affect the way medications for other conditions work. You might need to change your treatment plan if the doctor tells you that you need:

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Drugs & Medications A-Z

Drugs & Medications A-Z

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use.

Considering taking medication to treat depression? Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of depression. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below.

55 medications found for depression

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Common culprits and what you can do.

Things to remember when you fill your prescription.

Tips for dealing with them.

How to make sense of them.

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WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Psychotic Depression

Psychotic Depression

Psychotic depression is a subtype of major depression that occurs when a severe depressive illness includes some form of psychosis. The psychosis could be hallucinations (such as hearing a voice telling you that you are no good or worthless), delusions (such as, intense feelings of worthlessness, failure, or having committed a sin) or some other break with reality. Psychotic depression affects roughly one out of every four people admitted to the hospital for depression.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, a person who is psychotic is out of touch with reality. People with psychosis may hear “voices.” Or they may have strange and illogical ideas. For example, they may think that others can hear their thoughts or are trying to harm them. Or they might think they are possessed by the devil or are wanted by the police for having committed a crime that they really did not commit.

People with psychotic depression may get angry for no apparent reason. Or they may spend a lot of time by themselves or in bed, sleeping during the day and staying awake at night. A person with psychotic depression may neglect appearance by not bathing or changing clothes. Or that person may be hard to talk to. Perhaps he or she barely talks or else says things that make no sense.

People with other mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, also experience psychosis. But those with psychotic depression usually have delusions or hallucinations that are consistent with themes about depression (such as worthlessness or failure), whereas psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are more often bizarre or implausible and have no obvious connection to a mood state (for example, thinking strangers are following them for no reason other than to harass them). People with psychotic depression also may be humiliated or ashamed of the thoughts and try to hide them. Doing so makes this type of depression very difficult to diagnose.

But diagnosis is important. Its treatment is different than for nonpsychotic depression. Also, having one episode of psychotic depression increases the chance of bipolar disorder with recurring episodes of psychotic depression, mania, and even suicide.

Common symptoms for patients who have psychotic depression include:

Usually, treatment for psychotic depression is given in a hospital setting. That way, the patient has close monitoring by mental health professionals. Different medications are used to stabilize the person’s mood, typically including combinations of antidepressants and antipsychotic medications.

Antipsychotic drugs affect neurotransmitters that allow communication between nerve cells in areas of the brain that regulate our ability to perceive and organize information about the world around us. There are a number of antipsychotic, or neuroleptic, medications commonly used today. These include risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, cariprazine, and asenapine. Each drug has unique side effects and may differ in its clinical efficacy profile. Usually, though, these drugs are better tolerated than earlier antipsychotics.

Treatment for psychotic depression is very effective. People are able to recover, usually within several months. But continual medical follow-up may be necessary. If the medications do not work to end the psychosis and depression, sometimes electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is used. It’s important for the patient to work with the doctor to find the most effective drugs with the least side effects. Because psychotic depression is quite serious, the risk of suicide is also great.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: “What is Depression?”

National Institute of Mental Health: “What are the Different Forms of Depression?”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Medications.”

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5.

Fieve, R. Bipolar II, Rodale Books, 2006.

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Drugs & Medications A-Z

Drugs & Medications A-Z

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use.

Considering taking medication to treat cold symptoms? Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of cold symptoms. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below.

4792 medications found for cold symptoms

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Common culprits and what you can do.

Things to remember when you fill your prescription.

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Drugs & Diseases

Drugs & Diseases

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Medscape’s clinical reference is the most authoritative and accessible point-of-care medical reference for physicians and healthcare professionals, available online and via all major mobile devices. All content is free.

The clinical information represents the expertise and practical knowledge of top physicians and pharmacists from leading academic medical centers in the United States and worldwide.

The topics provided are comprehensive and span more than 30 medical specialties, covering:

More than 6000 evidence-based and physician-reviewed disease and condition articles are organized to rapidly and comprehensively answer clinical questions and to provide in-depth information in support of diagnosis, treatment, and other clinical decision-making. Topics are richly illustrated with more than 40,000 clinical photos, videos, diagrams, and radiographic images.

More than 1000 clinical procedure articles provide clear, step-by-step instructions and include instructional videos and images to allow clinicians to master the newest techniques or to improve their skills in procedures they have performed previously.

More than 100 anatomy articles feature clinical images and diagrams of the human body’s major systems and organs. The articles assist in the understanding of the anatomy involved in treating specific conditions and performing procedures. They can also facilitate physician-patient discussions.

More than 7100 monographs are provided for prescription and over-the-counter drugs, as well as for corresponding brand-name drugs, herbals, and supplements. Drug information included within Medscape Drugs & Diseases is based on FDA approvals. Drug images are also included.

Our Drug Interaction Checker provides rapid access to tens of thousands of interactions between brand and generic drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and supplements. Check mild interactions to serious contraindications for up to 30 drugs, herbals, and supplements at a time.

Access health plan drug formulary information when looking up a particular drug, and save time and effort for you and your patient. Choose from our complete list of over 1800 insurance plans across all 50 US states. Customize your Medscape account with the health plans you accept, so that the information you need is saved and ready every time you look up a drug on our site or in the Medscape app. Easily compare tier status for drugs in the same class when considering an alternative drug for your patient.

Medscape Reference features 129 medical calculators covering formulas, scales, and classifications. Plus, more than 600 drug monographs in our drug reference include integrated dosing calculators.

Hundreds of image-rich slideshow presentations visually engage and challenge readers while expanding their knowledge of both common and uncommon diseases, case presentations, and current controversies in medicine.

Click on citations within drug and disease topics in our clinical reference to review the clinical evidence on MEDLINE. Plus, search the MEDLINE database for journal articles.

Medscape is the leading online destination for healthcare professionals seeking clinical information. In addition to clinical reference tools, Medscape offers:

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Cancer Pain: What Helps?

Cancer Pain: What Helps?

Pain can be part of having cancer, but you don’t have to take it. Just like doctor appointments and tests, managing pain is another way to take control of your treatment.

When you’re in pain, it can affect everything from your sleep and appetite to the simplest tasks in your daily routine. Pain can also affect your emotions.

Speak up about your pain. Your doctors will want to know. It could be a sign that you have an infection, your cancer has spread, or there’s a problem with your cancer treatment.

You’re the only one who knows how cancer pain feels in your body. You’ll want to understand it, know how to communicate about it, and get the relief you need to live your life.

Cancer pain has many sources. It sounds simple, but it’s often caused by the cancer itself.

When cancer grows and harms tissue nearby, it can cause pain in those areas. It releases chemicals that irritate the area around the tumor. As tumors grow, they may put stress on bones, nerves, and organs around them.

Cancer-related tests, treatments, and surgery can cause aches and discomfort. You may also feel pain that has nothing to do with cancer, like normal headaches and tight muscles.

Each person is different. How you experience cancer pain depends on the type you have, its stage, and whether you have a low or high tolerance for pain. Most people with feel it in one of these three ways:

Your doctor may not always ask if you’re feeling pain. It’s up to you to say what hurts and ask for help.

If you have religious or cultural reasons to be concerned about taking medicines, share that. Set aside any worries you may have about looking weak. It’s actually a sign of strength to say how you feel. And you deserve to feel as good as possible.

Before your appointment, keep track of your pain so you can be as detailed as possible with your doctor. Use these questions as a guide:

Take your answers and all prescriptions, vitamins, and over-the-counter drugs with you to the appointment.

You’ve done your part. Now it’s time for your doctor to do his. Removing the cancer with surgery, chemotherapy or radiation is the first option to explore. If those aren’t possible — or you’re waiting to have a procedure — prescription medication can control the pain.

Medicines for pain fall into three categories:

You can take many opioids by mouth, in pill or liquid form. Some can be put inside the cheek or under the tongue.

If you can’t take medications that way, you may be able to take them through an IV, suppository or skin patch.

Any time your doctor gives you a new medication, make sure you know how much to take, how often to take it, and how long it takes to work. To make sure you get the most out of every dose, ask your doctor those questions and and a few more:

If medicine doesn’t help enough, doctors may try a treatment to stop pain messages from getting through.

When pain doctors inject medication in the nerve or spin to relieve pain, it’s called a nerve block. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) involves a small power pack that uses a light current to offset pain. You can attach it to yourself or carry it with you.

There are plenty of nonmedical treatments as well. Relaxing, distraction, and getting massages send positive messages to your body. You could also try acupuncture, hypnosis or biofeedback, which uses a machine that gives information to help you control your body. If your body is up for it, check out methods like yoga, tai chi and reiki. Meditation, prayer, and the company of loved ones may also help you get through, moment by moment.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Cancer pain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cancer pain: Relief is possible.”

National Cancer Institute: “Pain Control: Support for People With Cancer.”

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Drugs & Medications A-Z

Drugs & Medications A-Z

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use.

Considering taking medication to treat arthritic pain? Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of arthritic pain. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below.

560 medications found for arthritic pain

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Common culprits and what you can do.

Things to remember when you fill your prescription.

Tips for dealing with them.

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Drugs & Medications A-Z

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