Why Don’t You Listen to Social Media?

Why Don’t You Listen to Social Media?

Articles

Image by BL1961 via Flickr

Large companies are very concerned about their reputations, their brand images, the “word on the street,” and ten other hackneyed phrases that all add up to the same thing: they are listening to what people say about them. But when I talk to small businesses, I often find that they don’t pay as much attention. If you work in a small business, I want you to know that attitude is a mistake.

There are many reasons that small businesses don’t take the time to listen:

If you’ve been making excuses for why you’re not paying attention to what your customers are saying, it’s time to stop. Think of it as free market research–the kind that big companies pay a lot for. If you change your attitude and make listening a priority, perhaps you’ll start to get fewer complaints on the phone because you’ve improved what you do to better fit what customers want.

Mike is an expert in search marketing, search technology, social media, publishing, text analytics, and web metrics, who regularly makes speaking appearances.

Mike’s previous appearances include Text Analytics World, Rutgers Business School, SEMRush webinar, ClickZ Live.

Mike also founded and writes for Biznology, is the co-author of Outside-In Marketing (with James Mathewson) and the best-selling Search Engine Marketing, Inc. (now in its 3rd edition, and sole author of Do It Wrong Quickly, named by the Miami Herald as one of the 11 best business books of 2007.

I was in Texas two months ago looking for a mechanic to troubleshoot my diesel-powered pickup. A couple of folks warmly recommended one mechanic and gave me rave reviews of his service. I couldn’t find a phone number, so I searched for his business on my Google Maps application on my BlackBerry. The map found him, gave me the phone number and under Reviews, I found a couple of alarming customer comments. It was funny how what they had put in writing was negating everything my friends had told me about their experience with this mechanic. The reviews were older, but they were spot-on and very damaging to this business. I took a chance on my friends and the work was done on time and under budget. He also fixed the problem.

This is a good example of how a small business needs to be aware of what is being said about them. How many people have just avoided this mechanic because of those negative reviews on Google? Probably quite a few. Word of mouth extends beyond just the neighborhood; it extends to the world. And yes, I may be a bit too connected with my social media tools and toys, but those tools are providing me with an abundance of insight and caution about those small businesses that I chose to do business with.

Great story, Michael. A few months ago, one of my friends called me, nearly in a panic, because of a scathing (and false) review posted about his business on an Internet Yellow Pages site. I coached him through how to respond and how to contact the IYP site with proof that the review was false and it was removed. If he hadn’t been paying attention, who knows how much business he would have lost? In a one-man business, like his, it might be difficult to find the time to monitor what’s being said about you, but it’s extremely important.

Spot on, Mike! Keeping track of one’s online reputation is vital these days and, depending upon the size of the business, time consuming if one isn’t using the right tools. Still, taking a half-hour at night or on the weekend may prove to be a business-saver. It’s a matter of priorities and scheduling time to do it.

This is what small business owners should do, listen. There are millions of people using the web and definitely there are certain people who either say good and bad things about your business. Considering that social media is a great way to promote a business, this could also be a reason for a drop of your metrics. Monitoring your business reputation in the web should be definitely included within small business owner’s priorities.

An excellent post Mike! My work includes helping small businesses with local search and with customer feedback as part of building word of mouth. I think small business owners often have no clue about how much customer traffic flows through Web search engines — they’re still in a print Yellow Pages world. I recently talked to the general manager of a local car dealer and showed him 11 harsh reviews of his new car sales and his service. His response to me was, “I didn’t think it was that bad — we’re just trying to sell cars.” He hasn’t mentally transitioned to a Web 2.0 world where customers can plant a “do not shop here” sign right on top of his dealership, and he hasn’t modified his business practices to win in that new world. A small law firm I know received a single negative client review on Google. Instead of responding to the disgruntled client or asking satisfied clients for reviews, the firm removed its local listing from Google, thereby ceding local search clients to its competitors. I’ve found that the most effective way to educate small business owners is to actually show them how local search works and how reviews appear in those searches. It’s a starting point for discussing topics like soliciting reviews and responding to them. Again, thanks for discussing this important topic.

Good points, Paul. The sad thing is that if 11 customers had called him with the same feedback, he would have been asking himself what to do differently. But, as you say, too many businesses aren’t listening online.

How many people have just avoided this mechanic because of those negative reviews on Google? Probably quite a few. Word of mouth extends beyond just the neighborhood; it extends to the world. And yes, I may be a bit too connected with my social media tools and toys, but those tools are providing me with an abundance of insight and caution about those small businesses that I chose to do business with.Instead of responding to the disgruntled client or asking satisfied clients for reviews, the firm removed its local listing from Google, thereby ceding local search clients to its movie competitors. I’ve found that the most effective way to educate small business owners is to actually show them how local search works and how reviews appear in those searches.

Read by small business people, our newsletter delivers a digest of articles from the top search engine marketing experts. You will learn about:

Our newsletter is the perfect way to stay up to date with all of the latest trends, events and techniques in using search engines to grow your business and make more sales. Subscribe here. Your email address will NOT be given to third parties.

FreeFind Site Search Engine – FreeFind adds a “search this site” feature to your website, making your site easier to use. FreeFind also gives you reports showing what your visitors are searching for, enabling you to improve your site. FreeFind’s advanced site search engine and automatic site map technology can be added to your website for free.

Buy UPC Codes
Get your products listed online!

Search marketing information for small business owners.

Fetching the best small business news.

A friendly place to share small business ideas and knowledge.

Small business support through education, resources and community

The directory of the best small business sites and tools.

Clicky

Research & References of Why Don’t You Listen to Social Media?|A&C Accounting And Tax Services
Source

Leave a Reply