Magento & WordPress Integration

Magento is a well architectured, open-source e-commerce platform that are widely used these days. It has many professional and flexible functionalities, but one of the lacking features is a blogging tool. Its CMS is suitable to write static pages for websites, not for blogging. But there is another great open-source blogging software that is loved by numerous bloggers, WordPress. Integrating these two tools is not generally a big issue.

There are a couple of ways to integrate Magento e-commerce store with WordPress blog.

– You can install Magento plug-in to integrate WordPress. This extension allows you to manage both the store and the blog on the same interface. However, it seems some users have experienced difficulties to make it work especially when they use a customized / non-default theme. Download WordPress integration plug-in: Magento Extension – WordPress Integration

– Another way is to install both of them separately and modify .htaccess file(s) so that they won’t have conflicts.

One of the most common fixes of .htaccess related issues is to define RewriteBase in one of the .htaccess files.

Let’s say I’ve already installed my Magento store on ‘http://www.mystore.com’ and now I want to install WordPress blog to ‘http://www.mystore.com/blog/’.

Most likely, I don’t need to modify Magento .htaccess file. But I need to define RewriteBase and change RewriteRule appropriately in WordPress .htaccess file as follows.

By Jermaine, June 19, 2009 @ 10:05 am

Hi. Let’s say I’ve installed WordPress first and now want to install Magento. How could I make this work?

By ae, January 20, 2010 @ 12:44 pm

Of course, the if you devise a new Magento template the output need not be html. It might be slow but you could integrate the two by having wordpress consume the output from Magento.

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WordPress Category Order and Category Hierarchy

Category Hierarchy

I have a personal WordPress blog where there are some sub categories under top categories. Its theme is non widgetized, and the sidebar function to display categories is “wp_list_categories(show_count=1&hierarchical=0).”

By default, WordPress displays all categories at one level regardless their hierarchy. Fortunately, I found out a simple modification would fix the way to display categories in regard to hierarchy.

Change the value of the argument ‘hierarchical’ to ‘1′ from ‘0′.

Before:
wp_list_categories(hierarchical=0)

After
wp_list_categories(hierarchical=1)

Category Order

I also have another blog where I want to control over category display order. The default display of categories in WordPress is by their alphabetical order. You can re-order categories by installing WordPress Category Order Plug-in.

Upzip the downloaded file, upload it to the root plug-in directory, activate the plugin via WordPress admin interface, and then change category orders by clicking ‘Manage’ -> ‘Order Categories’.

Make sure you don’t use ‘orderby=count’ in the sidebar function ‘wp_list_categories()’.

By Linda Camurato, January 17, 2010 @ 3:44 pm

Thank you so much for this article. It worked and it was very easy to follow your instructions!

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WordPress Image Upload Error

It seems many WordPress users run into an image upload error with the media uploader. The error message are “An error occurred in the upload. Please try again later” or “HTTP error”.

It seems that this error occurs because of permission settings in “.htaccess” file of the top WP directory.

There are some plug-ins available for this problem, but if you feel comfortable with editing .htaccess file, please go ahead and add these lines:

<IfModule mod_security.c>
<Files upload.php>
SecFilterEngine Off
SecFilterScanPOST Off
</Files>
</IfModule>

Editing .htaccess file should be pretty simple when you have an access to FTP.

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WordPress Image Upload Error

It seems many WordPress users run into an image upload error with the media uploader. The error message are “An error occurred in the upload. Please try again later” or “HTTP error”.

It seems that this error occurs because of permission settings in “.htaccess” file of the top WP directory.

There are some plug-ins available for this problem, but if you feel comfortable with editing .htaccess file, please go ahead and add these lines:

<IfModule mod_security.c>
<Files upload.php>
SecFilterEngine Off
SecFilterScanPOST Off
</Files>
</IfModule>

Editing .htaccess file should be pretty simple when you have an access to FTP.

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How to Move WordPress

Moving WordPress is fairly easy, but it needs careful attention. The key point of WordPress directory change is to modify URL settings through the admin page and/or to change DB user information through “wp-config.php”. In most cases, re-installation is not necessary.

Moving WordPress Case by Case
1. Move WordPress to a new directory within the same website.
2. Move WordPress to an existing directory (including the root directory) within the same website.
3. Move WordPress to a new server with the same domain and the same directory.
4. Move WordPress to a new server with a different domain or a different directory.
5. Use WordPress plug-ins or tools to export and import data.
6. Update the internal links of the existing posts if necessary.
7. Modify the 404 page if necessary to indicated that some files may be missing because of directory change.
8. Manual update of the blog URLs using MySql queries.

In any case, backup is essential!

1. Move WordPress to a new directory within the same website.

to the top

to the top

to the top

to the top

to the top

to the top

to the top

to the top

2. Move WordPress to an existing directory within the same website. This includes moving WordPress directory to the root directory. It’s going to overwrite the destination files when their names are the same.

3. Move WordPress to a new server with the same domain and the same directory.

4. Move WordPress to a new server with a different domain or a different directory.

5. Use WordPress plug-ins or tools to export and import data. If you don’t feel comfortable to run queries, use this WordPress plug-in.

WP-DB-Backup
This tool allows you to back up WordPress DB data without using phpMyAdmin or command lines.

6. Update the internal links of the existing posts if necessary. The internal links within the existing posts and pages should be manually updated when they use absolute URLs. Otherwise, they still point to old locations.

Example) www.mydomain/oldblog/tips/how-to-move-wordpress.html
-> www.mydomain.com/newblog/tips/how-to-move-wordpress.html

Run this MySql query using phpMyAdmin or other DB tools.

7. Modify the 404 page if necessary to indicated that some files may be missing because of directory change.

Via WordPress Admin: Design -> Theme Editor -> 404 Template or
Via FTP: wp-content/themes/yourtheme/404.php
Example) http://www.free-ebusinesshelp.com/example-404page.html

8. In case that the blog URLs have not been changed, you can run this MySql query and manually update them.

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WordPress Spam – Plugins to Fight Comment Spams

Soon after I launched this blog, I started to receive heavy amount of spam comments, mostly from some Russian sites. It’s not only that I can’t read their comments in Russian, but some of their comments are extremely long. I think this overloads the database even though its impact may be minor.

Luckily, there are many plug-ins to fight spams for your WordPress blogs. Here are a couple of popular and effective solutions.

1. Akismet is a great anti-spam plug-in that comes installed by default. You just need to turn it on by clicking ‘Activate’.* With Akismet, you can set comment blacklist.** The beauty of this blacklist is that you don’t have to put the whole word or the whole IP address. It will block any comments that contain the partial words and partial IP address.

A lot of spams that I received from the Russian sites had different IP addresses almost every time because they hijacked the addresses. But their website domain or email address contains ‘.ru’. I just added ‘.ru’ to the blacklist and most of them were filtered.

* To activate Akismet, you will need to enter an API key that you can get from the WordPress website.
** To set up comment blacklist, click ‘Settings’ -> ‘Discussion’.

WordPress Comment Blacklist Block Russian Spams

2. Consider adding CAPTCHA if you want spams even not to be submitted. That’s what I did because I got tired of deleted the spams. Even if they were nicely filtered by Akismet, once in a while I needed to delete them otherwise I would have had thousands of spam sitting there, taking my DB space, possibly affecting DB performance.

I installed this plug-in “cformsII” in order to add CAPTCHA. “cformsII” is a powerful plug-in that allows you to create your own forms. You can easily replace the default WordPress comment form with a fancy and secure one that you can generate using cformsII.

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/cforms/

Create a new comment form using cformsII. You can use the default form that is shown when you access to the setting page first time.* Change the name of form to what you will recognize easily, for example, ‘comment’ and add / remove fields and change display configurations if you want to.

* It will show the link ‘cformsII’ next to the ‘Comments’ of the top menu.

Then, replace the PHP function “comments_template()” to “insert_cform(’name_of_form’)” in any PHP scripts that have the comment form. The files are different depending on which theme you use, but the usual scripts are ’single.php’, ‘archive.php’, and ‘page.php’.

<?php comments_template(); ?>

->

<?php insert_cform(’comment’); ?>

By admin, January 17, 2009 @ 11:51 am

After I tried cformsII for a week, I noticed that spam comments were submitted significantly less, but unfortunately, I also noticed the comments were not saved in database. They were delivered via emails only. Even though I found out later there was a configuration that I could change to store submission data in DB, this was not enough for me. I wanted to display the most recent comments on the side menu.

I could have customized the codes to show comments from the cformsII tables, but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to go that far. I ended up restoring the default WordPress comment form. As expected, within 30 minutes, I started to receive Russian spam comments again. Eventually, I found this plug-in, reCAPTCHA that adds CAPTCHA to the default comment form.

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-recaptcha/

I sometimes find it difficult to read their letter combination from the image that reCAPTCHA generates. The readability of the reCAPTCHA words could prevent users from leaving comments, but I believe it’s worthy because I won’t have to spend much of my time to clean up spam comments and to fix possible server performance issues.

By Alex Kaye, July 16, 2009 @ 9:24 am

Thanks very much for this article. I was having exactly the same problems…so many bloody Russian spam bots out there. Installed recaptcha on my blog. Hopefully it will take a nice load off.

By admin, July 17, 2009 @ 4:35 pm

Thanks for visiting! I hope it works for you! I still receive some spam comments, but it’s significantly less.

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WordPress Spam – Plugins to Fight Comment Spams

Soon after I launched this blog, I started to receive heavy amount of spam comments, mostly from some Russian sites. It’s not only that I can’t read their comments in Russian, but some of their comments are extremely long. I think this overloads the database even though its impact may be minor.

Luckily, there are many plug-ins to fight spams for your WordPress blogs. Here are a couple of popular and effective solutions.

1. Akismet is a great anti-spam plug-in that comes installed by default. You just need to turn it on by clicking ‘Activate’.* With Akismet, you can set comment blacklist.** The beauty of this blacklist is that you don’t have to put the whole word or the whole IP address. It will block any comments that contain the partial words and partial IP address.

A lot of spams that I received from the Russian sites had different IP addresses almost every time because they hijacked the addresses. But their website domain or email address contains ‘.ru’. I just added ‘.ru’ to the blacklist and most of them were filtered.

* To activate Akismet, you will need to enter an API key that you can get from the WordPress website.
** To set up comment blacklist, click ‘Settings’ -> ‘Discussion’.

WordPress Comment Blacklist Block Russian Spams

2. Consider adding CAPTCHA if you want spams even not to be submitted. That’s what I did because I got tired of deleted the spams. Even if they were nicely filtered by Akismet, once in a while I needed to delete them otherwise I would have had thousands of spam sitting there, taking my DB space, possibly affecting DB performance.

I installed this plug-in “cformsII” in order to add CAPTCHA. “cformsII” is a powerful plug-in that allows you to create your own forms. You can easily replace the default WordPress comment form with a fancy and secure one that you can generate using cformsII.

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/cforms/

Create a new comment form using cformsII. You can use the default form that is shown when you access to the setting page first time.* Change the name of form to what you will recognize easily, for example, ‘comment’ and add / remove fields and change display configurations if you want to.

* It will show the link ‘cformsII’ next to the ‘Comments’ of the top menu.

Then, replace the PHP function “comments_template()” to “insert_cform(’name_of_form’)” in any PHP scripts that have the comment form. The files are different depending on which theme you use, but the usual scripts are ’single.php’, ‘archive.php’, and ‘page.php’.

<?php comments_template(); ?>

->

<?php insert_cform(’comment’); ?>

By admin, January 17, 2009 @ 11:51 am

After I tried cformsII for a week, I noticed that spam comments were submitted significantly less, but unfortunately, I also noticed the comments were not saved in database. They were delivered via emails only. Even though I found out later there was a configuration that I could change to store submission data in DB, this was not enough for me. I wanted to display the most recent comments on the side menu.

I could have customized the codes to show comments from the cformsII tables, but I wasn’t sure if I wanted to go that far. I ended up restoring the default WordPress comment form. As expected, within 30 minutes, I started to receive Russian spam comments again. Eventually, I found this plug-in, reCAPTCHA that adds CAPTCHA to the default comment form.

http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wp-recaptcha/

I sometimes find it difficult to read their letter combination from the image that reCAPTCHA generates. The readability of the reCAPTCHA words could prevent users from leaving comments, but I believe it’s worthy because I won’t have to spend much of my time to clean up spam comments and to fix possible server performance issues.

By Alex Kaye, July 16, 2009 @ 9:24 am

Thanks very much for this article. I was having exactly the same problems…so many bloody Russian spam bots out there. Installed recaptcha on my blog. Hopefully it will take a nice load off.

By admin, July 17, 2009 @ 4:35 pm

Thanks for visiting! I hope it works for you! I still receive some spam comments, but it’s significantly less.

Source


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Add ‘Digg’ Button to Your WordPress Blog

Digg.com is a popular social news / bookmarking websites where people discover and share new content on the Internet. Users submit news, blog postings, web pages, images, and videos to share with others. Adding the Digg button will increase the opportunities to be “dugg”, which will help bringing more traffic to your blog.

There are some decent WordPress plug-ins to add the “Digg it” button to your blog posts and pages. Some of them come with detailed installation instructions as well.

I installed one of the most popular ones, but it shows the button on a separate line, resulting in moving the first paragraph to the next line as in the following image:

Put Digg Button to Your Blog

However, what I want is to have the text wrap around the image as in the most pages with Digg button I’ve seen on the Internet.

Add Digg This Button to WordPress Blog

Luckily, I’ve found out that I just need to add this simple line in the appropriate theme files – for me, single.php and index.php to show the button where I want it to be.

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