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Is It Ever Okay…To Take Over the Grilling at Someone Else’s Party?

Is It Ever Okay…To Take Over the Grilling at Someone Else’s Party?

For years we’ve encouraged you to marinate proteins before cooking. Well, we were sort of wrong (sorry!). Here’s how to get that picture-perfect sear and still pack in tons of flavor.

Conventional summertime wisdom holds that marinating and grilling are always to be done in that order: the former before the latter. But why, really, when the moisture and sugar in most marinades can actually cause a protein to simultaneously steam and burn without ever truly searing? Instead, we’re flipping the script and marinating after grilling. We’ve been inspired by the technique known as en escabèche, found in the cuisines of Spain, the Mediterranean, and Latin America (among others). It involves cooking fish and meat, then preserving them in an acidic mixture. This time around we’re putting an impeccable sear on swordfish steaks, flank steak, and summer vegetables, then soaking them in a punchy, piquant bath. In a rush? Let your hot-off-the-grill proteins soak for 15 minutes to build layers of flavor in record time. The longer they sit, the more flavor they’ll absorb. Just gently warm them and serve. Congrats: You’ve broken away from that pre-marinating tradition.

There’s only a kiss of honey in the vinaigrette, but it’s an essential player. With all the briny flavors from fish and the capers, you need a touch of sweetness for balance.

Say it with us: No more squishy, bland summer squash!

When it comes to grilling chicken breasts, it’s skin-on, bone-in all the way. The meat stays juicier, and you get the bonus of crispy skin.

Flank steak is flavorful but quite lean. To make sure it’s as tender and juicy as possible, be careful not to overcook it (medium-rare is best) and be absolutely certain you’re slicing against the grain.

Don’t be intimidated by the slices of jalapeños: The fire of the grill mellows their heat. If you’re a real spice-seeker, you can even leave some of them raw.

Don’t skip the skin-on fillets: The skin not only protects the delicate fish from overcooking but also gets deliciously crispy on the grill.

Is It Ever Okay…To Take Over the Grilling at Someone Else’s Party?

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